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There are two questions on "pretty vs quite" as follows:

“Pretty” versus “quite” posted on Feb 6, 2013.

“quite” vs “pretty” posted on Jul 8, 2014.

I have just noticed that the question asked in 2013 (first question) was close-voted four times as duplicate of the question asked in 2014 (second question). Shouldn't the second question (asked in 2014) be closed as a duplicate?

I think both of them have excellent answers. What is the reason to close the first question instead of the second question? Is there any guideline on this issue?

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    I chose to close the older one by looking at the upvotes one the questions and highest voted answer. I wanted to get the questions linked together because the there are good answers there and sometimes explaining things in different ways can help someone understand it. – ColleenV Apr 20 '16 at 12:34
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Take a look at Should I vote to close a duplicate question, even though it's much newer, and has more up to date answers?

The consensus in deciding things like duplicates is highly situation-dependent. Whether the questions got an answer or not, whether they contain some keywords or not etc. can affect the choice of 'dupe master'.

The question that has better answers should be the master, and after the newer question has gotten the answers the time of the asking isn't relevant. If both posts make excellent 'dupe masters' then it doesn't matter which becomes the master as long as we don't end up with circular duplication.

So I'd say everything's working fine.

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  • Thanks for the link and detailed answer. How about merging them as stated in the answer to the Meta post "You can flag and ask a moderator to merge after closure if they're exactly the same"? The question seems exactly the same. – user24743 Apr 20 '16 at 11:45
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    @Rathony Look over Dr. Strangedupe: Or, How I Learned to Stop Worrying And Love Duplication It is actually better in some situations to have the duplicates around instead of merging them because it gives folks a way to find the "master" answer more easily. – ColleenV Apr 20 '16 at 12:31
  • @Colleen - In my mind, this case does make a pretty good candidate for a merge. However, the ways quite and pretty are similarly used can vary quite a bit; e.g.: I did quite/pretty good on the exam; my last hotel stay was quite/pretty good; that car is quite/pretty new; that melon is quite/pretty ripe, etc. With that in mind, this might be a case where having the two questions remain two questions might be the best course of action, as it could provide a little more depth for the curious learner. – J.R. Apr 20 '16 at 21:49
  • @J.R. I thought the same thing about the merge, especially because of the similarity of the titles, but then I looked at the related questions in the sidebar and saw they were quite different. Each question offers a unique jumping off point to explore more about what is written in the question, so I think high quality questions like these shouldn't be merged. I'd be more inclined to see a lower quality question with a high quality answer get merged into another. – ColleenV Apr 20 '16 at 22:59

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